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Emory University

Picture of Valerie Lego

In 1973, nearly every Michigan resident was exposed to a toxic chemical. As I brought this story out of the shadows and examined the lasting health effects, I had an advantage: the story was heavily archived and documented.

Picture of Valerie Lego

In 1973, it was discovered that Michigan Chemical had accidentally used the flame retardant chemical PBB instead of a vitamin additive for cattle feed.

Picture of Deborah Schoch

In his eye-opening new book, Dr. Otis Brawley takes aim at doctors who prescribe too much, drug companies who promise too much, and the system that rewards them both with hefty incomes and sales.

Picture of Linda Perez
It was ten o'clock, wet heat was hard to bear and the doctor Neil Shulman desperately shouted through a loudspeaker: "It is going to die! They are going to die!". Around a dozen people nodded and looked at him with saddened eyes. Held in their hands banners reading: "Grady, Do not Let Them Die" (Grady, do not let them die!).
Picture of Linda Perez
Members of the Board of Commissioners of Fulton want to finally resolving the situation of former patients of the outpatient clinic of Grady Hospital dialysis and even questioned the close of this center last year.
Picture of Angilee Shah

Robert Davis, Ph.D., M.P.H. is on a mission: Reporters need to put on their skeptics' hats when they report on the latest and greatest in medical research.

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Robert J. Davis, Ph.D., M.P.H., has 20 years' experience as a health and medical journalist. Currently, he serves as president and editor-in-chief of Everwell, a company that creates and distributes consumer health video content. Previously, he was executive producer of the award-winning PBS series "HealthWeek," executive editor for Time Life Medical, and a producer for CNN medical news.

Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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