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environment

Picture of Eilis O'Neill
Asthma is on the rise across the United States, and the problem is particularly grave on reservations.
Picture of William Heisel
There's most likely a Superfund site near you. Here's why all that nasty toxic waste is ripe for sustained investigative reporting, as contributor Bill Heisel explains.
Picture of Monica Vaughan
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Monica Vaughan, a participant in the 2019 California Fellowship. Other stories in this series include: Health alert: Air quality warning issued for Nipomo Mesa advises residents to stay inside Live updates: Will off-roaders be banned from Oc
Picture of Tessa Duvall
“Everyone from my community has to go to prison," one Jacksonville inmate wrote. "It is the way it is. It is a way of life for us. We didn't know anything else.”
Picture of Sandy Mazza
Do you live near an oil or gas production facility in Southern California? Look up your neighborhood here.
Picture of Nancy  Cambria

It has long been known that growing up in impoverished and dangerous neighborhoods such as Ferguson, Missouri dims life prospects. But now a commanding body of medical research presents a disturbing, biological picture of why.

Picture of Ezra David  Romero

This is part of a Valley Public Radio original series on how the health of rivers impact the health of communities produced as a project for The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of USC's Annenberg School of Journalism.

Picture of David Danelski

We already knew about air pollution's link to asthma, heart disease, lung cancer, and shorter lives. But few of us have given much thought to its effect on the brain. Research in one of the most polluted places -- Mexico City -- sheds light on what might be happening in Inland Southern California.

Picture of Amanda Mascarelli

Researchers are growing increasingly aware that the prenatal period and early childhood are exquisitely sensitive to external insults such as environmental contaminants.

Picture of Liza Gross

Where you live—and who you are—plays a big part in how long you’ll live. If you live in poverty in California’s San Joaquin Valley, and you're Latino, you’re twice as likely to die prematurely as someone who is white and lives in an upper-class community.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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