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environment

Picture of John  Sepulvado

California regulators stop monitoring PCBs in the air at the Kettleman Hills Facility, then birth defects increase in Kettleman City, then regulators start monitoring, and birth defects go down.

Picture of John  Sepulvado

Kettleman City has a toxic PCB dump problem, or at least so says the U.S. Enivornmental Protection Agency. From the release:

Picture of Ryan ZumMallen

In my first few blogs, I've explained some of the environmental issues facing the city of Long Beach both today and in the long-term. The main point of concern is often pollution caused by operations at the Port of Long Beach. But another concern, perhaps just as dangerous to the community in terms of air pollution, are the nearby railyard facilities where cargo trains move in and out, all day and every day.

Picture of Rebekah Cowell

How an enormous wastewater treatment plant wound up near a small town's historic district.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The circumstances of where and how you are born, grow up, live, work  and grow old shape your health, just as your genes and lifestyle do. The growing field of "social determinants of health" focuses on the impact of these socioeconomic factors on health. Education, politics, violence, income, access to health care, social support, culture, transportation, environmental hazards, physical living conditions and even racism are topics for policymakers, researchers and journalists to consider as they examine health and health disparities within communities, nations and the world.

Picture of Stephan  Faris

When it comes to climate change, the most important impacts of the emissions from our cars, power plants and factories are likely to be broad and indirect. Global warming needs to be examined not just from the perspective of medicine, but from public health.

Picture of Ngoc Nguyen

Cheap doesn't necessarily mean safe when it comes to powerful cleaning products. New America Media environmental editor Ngoc Nguyen reports on efforts by environmental justice advocates to educate low-income consumers about how to stay healthy while keeping clean.

Picture of Ngoc Nguyen

When Esther Gress walks down the aisles at the grocery or drug store, she surveys the wall of cleaning products critically: disinfectant sprays, bottles of bleach, the all-purpose stuff. The 34-year-old, who has cleaned homes for a living for the past five years, used to use toxic chemicals on the job. Now, she bypasses these products for cleaners she mixes up herself.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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