Skip to main content.

environment

Picture of Sierra Crane-Murdoch

The site of the most significant childhood cancer cluster on national record can shed light on why epidemiology and other scientific inquiries into environmental health problems rarely secure regulatory change or care for those impacted.

Picture of Linda Marsa

In 2010, when I started researching the health effects of climate change for my book, Fevered, it seemed like this looming threat wasn’t on the nation’s radar screens. I was pessimistic that changes could be made in time to avert catastrophe. But as I drilled down, I was pleasantly surprised to disc

Picture of Rishi Manchanda

Innovative providers understand health is more than a chemical equation that can be balanced with pills and procedures. They see that health begins in our everyday lives, in the places where we live, work, eat, and play.

Picture of Yvonne LaRose

Since the auto is becoming a luxury item in terms of cost and fuel, and because environmentally speaking, using a personal auto is becoming a less desirable option, it's important for Southern California urban planners to come up with transportation options.

Picture of Terria  Smith

Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indian Reservation residents were instructed by the EPA 10 years ago not to drink the tap water. Any resident who is not an elder must provide his own drinking water. Everyone still uses the contaminated ground water to bathe and wash their dishes and clothes.

Picture of Sergio Flores

California's agricultural industry is tops in the nation and pesticides play a vital role in keeping it healthy. They also play a vital role in the lives of farm workers...a poisonous one.

Picture of Sara  Rubin

I'm honored to be participating in the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship in LA later this month. My fellowship proposal is a deeper look at groundwater contamination, with arsenic and nitrates identified as the two worst offenders.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Reporters Ruxandra Guidi and Erica Peterson live about 2,000 miles apart. But when they embarked on in-depth stories on environmental justices issues in their communities, they faced very similar challenges.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Veteran environmental reporter recommends starting by reporting the basic story first - focusing on what the problem appears to be, and how authorities and businesses are responding.

Picture of William Heisel

When I was growing up, I feared radon....

Pages

Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth