Skip to main content.

environment

Picture of Andrea Kobrinsky Alday

One of the biggest obstacles to revitalizing the Los Angeles River is convincing the people who live all around that it even exists and that it is a "real" river.

Picture of Angilee Shah

The embattled U.N. World Food Program reports that 13 million people have been affected by drought and famine in the Horn of Africa. It's a huge health story, but how can journalists report on it well?

Picture of Angilee Shah

It might cause a snicker or two from many Angelenos, but last week, I took a tour of the Los Angeles River.

Picture of Roseann Langlois

Californians are required to disclose the radon level in their home, if known, before transferring it to a new owner. Nevadans are not. In both states, renters are particularly vulnerable. "There are no regulations to protect renters from radon in Nevada," said Susan Howe, radon education program director for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. "There are no regulations dealing with radon in Nevada, period. There are no laws to protect people when they buy or build homes."

Picture of Roseann Langlois

More than two decades after U.S. regulators first issued guidelines on radon infiltration into homes and buildings, the World Health Organization reports that the radon threat to human health is much more serious than previously known.

Picture of Rebekah Cowell

In Orange and Guilford counties, neighbors fight landfill expansions

Picture of Robert  McClure

Seattle’s only river is – officially – a toxic waste dump. The Duwamish River is one of the few Superfund sites anywhere in the country extending for miles through the heart of a city. Facing off across the Duwamish are the neighborhoods of South Park and Georgetown – some of Seattle’s poorest and most diverse communities.

Picture of Robin  Urevich

In Salinas, a group of activists say the local hospital board doesn't represent the people it serves, and they're pushing for change.

Picture of Linda Marsa

At what point will our planet become too darn hot? Scientists are now saying that if we don't do anything about curbing carbon emissions, temperatures in the next few decades could rise so high so fast that many regions of the Earth will become inhabitable.

Picture of Robin  Urevich

At a Planned Parenthood clinic near Salinas, farm workers who plan to have children in the near future are learning to protect themselves against pesticide exposure on the job. "This is dangerous work," said Jessica Dieseldorff, a nurse practitioner who's heading up the pilot education program.

 

Pages

Announcements

Our California Fellowship supports reporters in the Golden State pursuing ambitious projects on overlooked health and health equity issues.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth