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In Salinas, organic farmers struggle to build businesses in the epicenter of industrial agricuture.

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The nuclear crisis still playing out in Japan may be happening thousands of miles away, but there are numerous relevant stories that health reporters can unearth in the United States that go beyond breaking news.

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Contaminated waters mean exposure to 42 chemicals for people who consume fish from the Duwamish River, despite posted warnings. For those who depend on the river as a primary food source, this frightening possibility is not enough of a deterrent.

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Studies show that residents living in neighborhoods near the Dumawish River are highly susceptible to illness and lower life expectancy, especially compared to those living in other areas of King County.

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Environmental justice is an old mandate getting a new life under Lisa Jackson, the first African-American head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

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Despite reassurances from public health officials that, for now, radioactive fallout from Japan’s worsening nuclear crisis will have a negligible impact on U.S. shores, Americans nevertheless are making an ill-considered run on the potassium iodide pills that can prevent radiation-related thyroid cancers.

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Here’s the latest in health and health journalism news from Reporting on Health. Our hearts also go out to the people of Japan after today’s catastrophic earthquake – here’s how to help the victims.

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Why is the controversial pesticide methyl iodide set to be used in California strawberry fields? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Utah County's blogging "asthma mom" offers tips to help people avoid attack triggers. It is a sidebar to the third part of May's series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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