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epidemic

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Instead of leaping onto the fearwagon when a bug seems to appear out of nowhere, check the science. Then consider seeking out the real infection hotspots in your community.
Picture of Ryan White

There has been a bevy of headlines on child obesity this week, triggered by a new study casting doubt on earlier reports of drops in early childhood obesity rates. But real story is rather more complicated than the headlines suggest.

Picture of Patricia Wight

"There were a few times when I felt I had reached a dead end," writes Patricia Wight. "I worried that my stories would be missing the critical first-person experiences needed to bring the issues surrounding obesity to life."

Picture of Leonardo Castaneda

Working with data, it’s often easy to forget that each entry represents a real human being. An opioid abuse epidemic like the one taking place in San Diego isn’t just a statistically significant outlier — it’s a series of individual human tragedies.

Picture of Seema Yasmin

Zika virus has been generating a lot of news lately. But the reports haven't always been accurate. Dr. Seema Yasmin offers a quick primer and dispels a couple of myths for reporters filing stories on the epidemic as it spreads through the Americas.

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The number of valley fever cases has soared so high in recent years that health experts are calling it "The Second Epidemic."
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now confirms a sharp rise in cases of the fungal disease, especially in California and Arizona.

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Legislators are poised to take action on valley fever, a long-ignored disease that is the subject of a Reporting on Health Collaborative project.

Picture of Laura Ungar

Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, NARA, offers inpatient and outpatient drug treatment and a 70-bed residential program in Portland, Oregon.

Picture of Laura Ungar

Research from across the nation shows that treating drug addiction reduces crime and medical expenses while boosting employment, meaning every dollar spent on treatment actually saves an average of $7.

Picture of Laura Ungar

This organization receives more than 40,000 calls a year to its crisis lines, which guide addicts through those dark moments by connecting them with the treatment they need.

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