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Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

An infectious disease spread to humans by mosquitoes that have bitten infected birds, West Nile virus historically was seen only in Africa, Europe and Asia before it was first detected in the United States in 1999. Though the majority of those infected show no symptoms, the disease can be deadly, particularly in the elderly. If West Nile virus enters the brain, it can cause encephalitis or meningitis. The major way to prevent infection is to avoid mosquitoes and to reduce mosquitoes in populated areas. Updated June 2010

Picture of William Heisel

The readers of the Lancaster (Penn.) New Era had ample reason to be doubtful of the new doctor who had come to town being touted as “the infant whisperer.”

The New Era wrote a classic, glowing profile, quoting patients who said Dr. Saroj K. Parida, chief of neonatology at Lancaster Regional Medical Center, had saved their children’s lives. And perhaps he had.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Are you confused, angry and, frankly, pissed off as you watch sumo-sized egos battle out the mammogram issue? How will it affect you and your loved ones? What actually is the thinking behind the new United States Preventative Services Task Force recommendation to NOT screen women in their forties for breast cancer? Is it as nonsensical as it sounds? Doc Gurley gives you a common sense, plain-language explanation of the ins and outs of this complex issue. She's a practicing board-certified internist who's also published cost-effectiveness research.

Picture of Darhoon Menghwar

From Darhoon Menghwar, of the Daily Ibrat, a Sindhi newspaper in Hyderabad, Sindh province, Pakistan, who attended a Thomson Reuters Foundation “Reporting HIV/AIDS” course in Bangkok in 2008.

Picture of Stephan  Faris

When it comes to climate change, the most important impacts of the emissions from our cars, power plants and factories are likely to be broad and indirect. Global warming needs to be examined not just from the perspective of medicine, but from public health.

Picture of Natalie Walsh

We continue our 5-part series on the high cost of health care in America.

Picture of Natalie Walsh

As Congress goes into recession, the debate over healthcare hits home. But what's really happening on the reform front? Will it meet the needs of the American public? In a 5-hour special series over five days, we'll hear from doctors, hospital administrators, insurance companies, economists and average people about what's driving up healthcare costs, what it will take to make real changes, and what trade-offs people are willing to make to see meaningful reform through.

Picture of Tinker Ready

Drug companies are looking outside their own labs for new products

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