Skip to main content.

Ezra Klein

Picture of Angilee Shah

It was an eventful weekend in the news. Today's Daily Briefing will help you catch up on health in the debt deal, learn surprising facts about clinical trials abroad and violence in hospitals, and connect with tough-but-important stories about famine and homelessness.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Paying medical bills with pennies, worries about dental care for California's poor kids, AIDS at 30 and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why is health care in California's prisons still so inadequate after a court order and billions of dollars in spending? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A doctors' gag order over fracking chemicals, good news on obesity prevention, and a rapping global health expert turned World Bank leader, plus more from our Top 5 Today.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Doctors at some universities are still getting lucrative speaking gigs from Big Pharma, and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here’s what we’re checking out today:

Sniffle: A new study suggests that you’ll get fewer colds if you’re older, male and married. If you’re none of the above, getting regular exercise seems to prevent the sniffles, Julie Deardorff reports for the Chicago Tribune.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here's a recap of the latest developments on the health reform front, along with some helpful resources and story ideas for your community.

March 21, 2010, 10 p.m. PST

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Sorry, Jody Ranck. I’m giving up on NetVibes for right now and will stick to my Google and Yahoo readers.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

UPDATE: 9:54 p.m., Jan. 19

The phrase "stunning upset" doesn't even begin to capture the national political shockwaves as Republican Scott Brown defeats Martha Coakley for the late Sen. Edward Kennedy's seat. The "what happens to health reform now?" political analysis below remains relevant. In the meantime, here's a quick roundup of the latest coverage and analysis:

Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth