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Picture of Soreath Hok
A deeper look into the past of Cambodian refugees in California's Central Valley shows how they’ve rebuilt their lives decades after resettling in the U.S.
Picture of Jenna Kunze
The third in a three-part series following intergenerational impacts the United States’ nearly 200 year policy of Indian boarding schools had, and continues to have, on some tribal members on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota today.
Picture of Jenna Kunze
The second in a three-part series following intergenerational impacts the United States’ nearly 200 year policy of Indian boarding schools had, and continues to have, on some tribal members on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota today.
Picture of Theodore Alcorn
Reducing New Mexico’s extraordinary alcohol death rate will require a whole-of-society approach.
Picture of Jenna Kunze
The first in a three-part series following the intergenerational effects that the United States government’s century and a half practice of placing Indian children in boarding schools has had on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
Picture of Viji Sundaram
California’s coercive control law was enacted too late to help Blanca in her divorce from a husband she describes as manipulative and emotionally abusive.
Picture of Amy Yurkanin
For decades, doctors defaulted to hysterectomy to treat fibroid symptoms. That’s changing as patients push for more awareness and a wider range of treatment options.
Picture of Viji Sundaram
One immigrant endured more than two decades of psychological and financial abuse by her husband yet didn’t think she was a victim. Legal safeguards are limited and came too late to help her.
Picture of David Martin Davies
Type 2 diabetes in children was rare 40 years ago, but not anymore, according to Dr. Jane Lynch, a professor of pediatric endocrinology at UT Health San Antonio.
Picture of Edwin Rios
Many people were kicked out despite eviction moratoriums—but certain communities faced the brunt of it.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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