Skip to main content.

Family Medicine

Picture of Alexander Smith

In the past couple of years, the Affordable Care Act has provided thousands of residents at Wyandotte County with health insurance, creating a surge in demand for health care in a county that had already been designated a Health Professional Shortage Area by the federal government.

Picture of William Heisel

The Bakersfield Californian recently took on one of the most ambitious health care quality projects I have seen attempted by an outlet outside of the really big markets. One reporter, Kellie Schmitt, wanted to answer two questions: whether most of the doctors in Kern County were from another country and whether that mattered.

Picture of William Heisel

When is a doctor too old to practice safely? That depends, says Dr. William Norcross, who founded a national doctors' remedial education center and now advocates for regular testing of aging doctors for cognitive problems like dementia.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

Over the weekend, I took a long look at what the health-reform law does to address a looming shortage of primary care doctors. And the short answer is: Not much.

Picture of Shannon Muchmore

Is Oklahoma headed toward a crisis in access to health care? Health experts say yes — for many reasons. This three-part series examines the problems, how they affect all Oklahomans and what can be done to change the situation.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

Health care reform law will increase demand, but low salaries are discouraging young doctors from entering primary care.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

A look into why Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a severe lack of physicians.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

Picture of William Heisel

Although Doctors Behaving Badly tends to focus on exactly what you would expect, its mission is to make people aware of the many ways that patients are left unprotected.

There are nearly 1 million licensed, practicing physicians nationwide. Antidote has no ability to count how many are “behaving badly,” but it is safe to say that only a slim minority are tainting the reputation of the medical community. Doctors who abuse, injure or kill patients are the surrogate markers for an illness in the physician discipline system. They are not the illness.

Announcements

Our California Fellowship supports reporters in the Golden State pursuing ambitious projects on overlooked health and health equity issues.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth