Skip to main content.

farm worker

Picture of Alma Martinez

Arysta LifeScience, the manufacturer of methyl iodide, a toxic fumigant used in soil preparation for strawberries, carrots and other vegetable crops, has just announced that it is suspending all sales of the known carcinogen in the U.S.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

It's no surprise that the Central Valley is a medically underserved community, where recruiting doctors is a tough task. Many of the doctors working here have attended medical school overseas. In fact, if you crunch the numbers, Kern County comes in fourth among California's 58 counties for having the most foreign-trained doctors.

Picture of Alma Martinez

The U.S. EPA has opened a public comment period on methyl iodide, a highly toxic fumigant used in soil preparation before the planting of strawberries, carrots, and other vegetable crops. There are many points of view on this issue worth exploring. Here are just a few.

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Katherine A. Flores is director of the Latino Center for Medical Education and Research Center, a unit of the UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program. The center is intended to address the serious shortage of Latino physicians and other health care professionals in the area by guiding individuals to become health care professionals who ultimately return to the San Joaquin Valley and provide culturally competent health care services to the medically underserved.

Picture of Admin User

Dr. Bonnie Bade is a medical anthropologist whose work focuses on farm worker health, health care, California agriculture and farm labor, transnational migration, and ethnomedicine and ethnobotany among peoples of both indigenous Oaxaca and indigenous Southern California. Dr. Bade has worked with Mixtec communities in California, the San Diego/Tijuana border region, the San Joaquin Valley, and Oaxaca for over 15 years. Dr. Bade earned her Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of California, Riverside in 1994.

Picture of Admin User

Barbara A. Garcia is director of health at the San Francisco Department of Public Health. She previously served as deputy director starting in 1999, when she became responsible for the department's community programs, which are comprised of over 2,000 civil-service employees and 150 community-based organizations delivering primary care, behavioral health, maternal and child health, prevention and health promotion, housing and urban health, indigent health, adolescent health and women's health services.

Announcements

The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth