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FDA

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A program that creates market incentives to encourage drug makers to target rare pediatric diseases seemed like good policy at first. But evidence of the program's effectiveness is missing.
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Officials for a state campaign aimed at ending tobacco use among California’s children are supporting a tobacco tax increase initiative for the November ballot that will raise the price of cigarettes and vaping products but tobacco companies are fighting to stop it.
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The Portland Tribune's Peter Korn, a 2009 National Fellow, recently took a look at Oregon residents who've turned to unconventional treatments, and their difficulties in finding doctors who will work them. Korn says this is a story that could be easily localized by reporters elsewhere.

Picture of JoNel  Aleccia

The FDA finally took action on a long-delayed petition Thursday, allowing folic acid to be added to corn-masa flour to potentially prevent birth defects. The vitamin has been added to other grains for years.

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Advocates have been urging the FDA to allow corn masa to be fortified with folic acid for years, with the goal of curbing rare birth defects among Hispanic children. The FDA hasn't budged so far, but that could change as the agency reviews new research.

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The Food and Drug Administration will review a long-delayed petition calling for the voluntary addition of folic acid to corn masa to prevent neural-tube defects such as those seen in Washington’s cluster.

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Patients receiving blood transfusions are at risk of infection with Chagas disease, a tropical illness, according to an investigation by The Dallas Morning News and broadcast partner KXAS-TV.

Picture of JoNel  Aleccia

The federal Food and Drug Administration has agreed to review a long-delayed petition to fortify corn masa flour with folic acid, a move advocates say is crucial to preventing devastating birth defects like those seen in an ongoing cluster of cases in Washington state.

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Last week, the New England Journal of Medicine published a landmark study by CDC researchers on the safety of dietary supplements. The new study stands as a strong challenge to our current regulatory framework, as our Slow Medicine contributors explain.

Picture of Becca  Aaronson

Proponents of the new abortion regulations in Texas say they improve safety standards to protect women's health at facilities that perform abortions. Abortion rights advocates argue that they've endangered women's safety and imposed on their constitutional right to an abortion.

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