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Federal assistance in the United States

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California hospitals are facing a $22 billion decrease in Medicare funding by 2022, according to industry analysts, forcing many hospitals to evaluate how they will stay afloat. One solution is converting some hospitals to a Critical Access Hospital, but what will this mean for patients?

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Mental health providers in Illinois acknowledge that the state is in a dire budget situation. They say they have become more resourceful, finding ways to continue serving their patients and hope that the Affordable Care Act will help their situation.

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The Affordable Care Act was crafted with an ambitious goal of expanding health care coverage to millions of uninsured Americans. But they won’t enroll if they don’t know about available policies or if it’s too cumbersome or confusing to sign up for coverage.

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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) may be the law of the land, but it looks like Americans' ability to to access the benefits it promises will vary greatly depending on where they live. Only a minority have agreed to implement the federal law as written.

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Aware that her children were ineligible for the state's health care program, Irina Flores-Montalban, 38, found herself facing a painful dilemma: choosing which of them to insure.

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As Congress grapples with immigration reform, questions are arising about the impact new Americans and legal residents could have on U.S. social programs, among them the health care system.

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It’s a Medicare reform idea that seems pretty straightforward, and for proponents on both sides of the political aisle, a fair-minded approach to solving the entitlement program’s funding woes -- make more financially well-heeled Medicare beneficiaries foot more of the bill for their care....

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As the deficit reduction discussions heat up again in Congress, Medicare will certainly come under the microscope. What happens to the federal program could impact President Obama's legacy as it relates to Medicare.

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Sophia, 44, works up to 40 hours per week at a Mexican restaurant in Gurnee, Ill., making $10 an hour. With every paycheck, she said, $136 goes to payroll taxes, $62 of which goes to Social Security and Medicare. But as an undocumented immigrant, she will never receive those entitlements.

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The Medicare NewsGroup asked its newly formed Medicare Leaders Advisory Board – a group of prominent former leaders of the federal program and political veterans – this question: “What context should journalists have in order to evaluate competing Medicare reform proposals?”...

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

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