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Fellowship story

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The Santa Cruz Sentinel's Megha Satayanarayana reports on health care issues facing the Spanish-speaking communities of South Santa Cruz County.

Part One: Silver Smiles

Part Two: Alone with Autism, Latino families struggle with the mysterious illness

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A child's lifestyle, diet and genetics all play a role in their health, but the biggest obstacle to a child receiving good nutrition is socioeconomic.

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Southern Arizona children are suffering from adult afflictions — and doctors blame it on a troubling surge in childhood obesity.

In Arizona 31 percent of children between the ages of 10 and 17 are overweight or obese, experts say.

Lifestyle, diet and genetics play a role, but the biggest common denominator among them is socioeconomic.

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The Portland Tribune's Peter Korn takes a look at why some Oregon residents are turning to naturopathic doctors for their primary care.

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Dr. Manoj Jain takes a look at the patient doctor surveys that were conducted in Memphis and gives a doctor's point of view on choosing a primary care physician.

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A growing national movement seeks to connect ex-offenders with health care services. Many people say it makes financial sense. Some say it can possibly reduce crime.

Picture of Caitlan Carroll

Medical training covers very little on how to confront dying and death with their patients and their families. Marketplace's Caitlan Carroll visits the San Diego Hospice and the Institute for Palliative Medicine, where they are training physicians on how to tailor care around patients' last wishes.

Picture of Caitlan Carroll

End-of-life care is often the most expensive health care. Many people, when given the option, choose to opt out of experimental therapies and drugs as they approach death, but the current health care system structure incentivizes more care instead of less. So patients' wishes often get left out of the equation.

Picture of Eduardo A. de Oliveira

Children from low-income families may be able to take advantage of government funds for health care. Some obstacles may prevent these families from using these funds, like language knowledge and immigration status. Eduardo A. de Oliveira reports.

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When someone living in New York's West African Communities shows signs of mental illness, friends and family don't send the individual to a doctor. The community gathers up enough money to send them to Africa for treatment. Laura Starecheski reports from New York.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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