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fitness

Picture of David Mendez
Since the 2009 publication of “The Blue Zones," Dan Buettner has devoted himself to reengineering communities to improve residents' health.
Picture of Sarah Gustavus
Chronic illnesses, particularly diabetes, are a longstanding public health concern in many tribal communities in the Southwest. Sarah Gustavus and Antonia Gonzales examine how some individuals have overcome those challenges and are now sharing information and resources.
Picture of Jondi Gumz

Two years ago Sara Keenan was overweight and dependent on pain-killers that were shutting down her lungs and putting her at risk of dying. Today she is off pain-killers and 170 pounds lighter, with ambitions to become a personal coach to give hope to others who are overweight. Here is how she did it

Picture of Kate Long

Journalist Kate Long explores West Virginia's epidemics of chronic disease and obesity and the efforts to prevent them in an ongoing series called "The Shape We're In."

Picture of Kate Long

More than one in four West Virginia fifth-graders are now obese. One in four already has high blood pressure. What's their future going to be?

Picture of Michelle Rivas

If you’ve joined the Pinterest revolution, you understand how important those Saturday morning pinning sessions can be for your wardrobe, DIY projects and your dream wedding planning (that you will forever hide from your novio). If you haven’t discovered the wondrous collection of organized pinni

Picture of Vicky Hallett

Too many folks have the wrong idea about the YWCA — and not just because they figure it’s the same thing as the YMCA.

Picture of Katharine Mieszkowski

Students at Sycamore Valley have a lot to be happy about when it comes to their physical fitness. Fifth graders there got the best scores among all of their Bay Area peers on the 2011 statewide Physical Fitness Test.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Bedbugs vs. humans, flabby school children, and cutbacks in lead poisoning prevention money, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Vicky Hallett

If there's nowhere or way to exercise, how can we expect people to get physical activity?

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