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Florida

Picture of Julio Ochoa
For Florida patients with no insurance or ability to pay, there are few options for mental health treatment, unless they are a danger to themselves and institutionalized.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
Disturbed by stories about the rape and beatings of teens by supervisory staff and fellow detainees, Miami-Dade’s state attorney is asking a grand jury to investigate the Florida juvenile justice system.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
On a Monday in early October, the top administrator at the the Manatee Regional Juvenile Detention Center in Bradenton, Florida issued a terse order to subordinates: “Do not flush.”
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
Members of a state committee that oversees Florida's Department of Juvenile Justice dismissed assertions that the abuse of children in state custody is the work of a few “bad apples” — and vowed to start hunting for concrete solutions.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
This article and others in this series were produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism....
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The lawmaker who oversees a powerful criminal justice committee said he will lead a much-needed reform of Florida's juvenile justice system in the wake of a Miami Herald series that detailed the existence of a mercenary system in which detainees are rewarded for pounding other youths.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
When juvenile detention worker Uriah T. Harris heard the boys in his charge using profane language, he calmly offered a choice: they could be struck with a broom handle or receive demerits that could lengthen their stay. Many boys were hit with the broom.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
This article and others in this series were produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
This article and others in this series were produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
The juvenile justice employees who enforce rules, dole out discipline, offer guidance, and help decide how long teenagers must remain locked up are the foundation of the youth correctional system. Some have criminal records little better than the youths they supervise.

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