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The other day, Reporting on Health asked its friends to share stories about their best health journalism adventures and misadventures. We made it a contest on our own ReportingonHealth Facebook page and offered prizes of a $50 itunes card (1st prize) and In Pantagonia, Bruce Chatwin's adventure saga (2nd Prize).

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Could regular use of ibuprofen help prevent Parkinson's disease? Answers and more from our Daily Briefing.

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West Virginia lawmakers want Florida's governor to reconsider his plan to drop a prescription monitoring program they say would cut down on pill trafficking.  

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Treatment centers such as Chad's Hope in Clay County aim to help get prescription drug addicts back on track. This story is part of a series that examines prescription drug abuse in Kentucky.

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West Virginia officials say they're disappointed that Florida's governor wants to kill a planned prescription drug monitoring program in the Sunshine State, which is a destination for people who deal pills.

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Bell County in southeastern Kentucky currently has the eighth worst prescription drug death rate in the nation. Victims are citizens of every economic level, and the effects are hurting innocent people.

This story is part of a series that examines prescription drug abuse in Kentucky.

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Requiring a prescription for certain cold medicines could dramatically reduce methamphetamine production in West Virginia, a national substance-abuse expert told state lawmakers.

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As drug-related deaths continue to rise, state funding for patient outreach is on the decline. This story is part of a series that examines prescription drug abuse in Kentucky.

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Journalist Mark Taylor examines how one Gary, Indiana emergency room continues to serve some of the sickest and neediest patients in the region, handling more gunshot, knife wound and violent trauma cases than other area ERs, alongside the chronically ill.

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The Wall Street Journal’s series on Medicare costs, “Secrets of the System,” sets the mind spinning with possibilities for future health investigations. I culled five tips from the on Wednesday. Here are five more. Next week, I will offer a few story ideas that could grow out of the Journal’s efforts to crack open the Medicare claims database for everyone.

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