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We have a guest post today from Felice Freyer, veteran medical writer for the Providence Journal, member of the Association of Health Care Journalists Board of Directors and chair of AHCJ's Right to Know Committee.

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Evan George at the Los Angeles Daily Journal, a newspaper focused on the legal community, wrote a great investigative series about disability insurance last month. He spoke to Antidote last week about how he got started on the project. The second part of the interview is below. It has been edited for space and clarity.

Q: Did you start small or did you immediately dive into looking up all 500+ cases?

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SAN MARCOS, CA.- A María Chávez su gordura le molestó por años. Pero fue hasta que el sobrepeso trajo a su vida dolor y pérdidas que se decidió a combatirlo.

Chávez, 48 años, es directora de Educación Migrante en el condado de San Diego y Orange. Un programa de apoyo educativo dirigido a los hijos de campesinos y sus padres.

Chávez pesaba 184 libras hace año y medio cuando empezó una nueva forma de vida. Ya perdió 26 libras y quiere eliminar dos más para llegar al peso recomendado por el médico.

Pero no es todo.

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Perhaps more than anyone who has ever written about ghostwriting in medical literature, Kim Klausner knows where the bodies are buried. Klausner is the Industry Documents Digital Libraries Manager for the University of California-San Francisco, which means she is in charge of the Drug Industry Documents Archive, a collection of thousands of documents that detail how the drug industry has used continuing medical education and medical literature to help market its products.

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Before describing a few stories that have not received much play in the media, I'd like to mention a few publications by my Urban Institute colleagues that provide useful state and local information. One report shows, by Congressional district, the proportion of residents with various types of health coverage (uninsured, privately insured, or covered by Medicaid or other public programs).

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Thomas Sullivan writes the Policy and Medicine blog. He also runs Rockpointe Corporation, a medical education company that works with nonprofits and for-profits to create continuing medical education (CME) programs. As company-sponsored CME and ghostwriting by companies has come under fire, Sullivan has become an outspoken advocate for medical education firms.

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Dr. Patrick Dean has pulled off a magic trick to make Houdini proud.

The founder and president of GI Pathology, a national testing laboratory based in Memphis, Dean has practiced medicine without a license in at least two states. Practicing without a license is often a career killer for a physician. Not so with Dean.

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This week, I'm going to focus on the best bloggers, tweeters and online aggregators to help you stay abreast of developments in this year's biggest health stories: H1N1/swine flu and health reform.

Today's post highlights H1N1/swine flu, with more on health reform Thursday. This is by no means meant to be a comprehensive list and I welcome your comments on any resources particularly useful to journalists that I may have missed. You can also check out ReportingonHealth's general resources for covering H1N1/swine flu here.

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In the end, the dirty dentist didn't get away with it.

A Collier County Circuit Court judge last week sentenced David Rees Sperry to 10 years in prison for lewd and lascivious battery after Sperry attacked a 14-year-old boy at a beach near Naples, Florida, and forced the boy to perform oral sex on him.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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