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Florida

Picture of Kathleen McGrory
As the number of kids killed by firearms continues to rise in Florida, legislation to address the problem has gone nowhere. Meanwhile, tragedies continue to unfold.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
States such as Kentucky and Arizona are seeking to change how their Medicaid programs work through new policies that include work requirements, enrollment lockouts and increased cost sharing.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
Data allowed reporter Kathleen McGrory to show gun accidents involving children were a growing problem in Florida. But it was the story of one family that really made the difference.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
Gun injuries are a growing problem for Florida’s children, rising along with the increasing availability of firearms across the state, an investigation by The Tampa Bay Times has found.
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
Juvenile lockups and correctional programs have became warehouses for children like Keishan Ross with developmental disabilities and mental illness.
Picture of Maggie Clark
In 14 Sarasota County schools, second-graders will have the chance to receive free dental sealants on their molars through a partnership between the Department of Health in Sarasota County and four local foundations.
Picture of Maggie Clark

What to do when you can't find the right research for your story? A Florida newspaper pursued a novel collaboration with researchers on a new study on how the state's Medicaid program impacts children.

Picture of Maggie Clark

These days, hundreds of Texas pediatric dentists spend their days counseling parents about the importance of taking care of their young children’s teeth. Can Florida's troubled Medicaid dental program emulate Texas' success?

Picture of Maggie Clark

Keriana Carll cries in pain nearly every day. Her mouth hurts. The 4-year-old has such severe dental disease that she had to get her front tooth pulled. But no dentist in Florida's Sarasota or Manatee County was willing to treat her.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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