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Florida

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A California HMO dramatically improves blood pressure control, Americans oppose Medicaid overhaul, and an update on kids' access to dental care, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

After being busted for dispensing prescriptions over the Internet and providing poor medical care to his patients, Dr. Stephen Hollis says he still maintains a thriving eye surgery practice. He talks about his past and present in a surprisingly candid interview.

Picture of William Heisel

A doctor busted for prescribing drugs for an Internet pharmacy talks about how and why he did it.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Too many colonoscopies, budget deficits bog down California's health reform rollout and a rare case of bubonic plague, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Banning chocolate milk in schools, a newspaper's searing assisted living investigation and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

What happens when someone dies who has no assets – or friends or relatives – to pay for his burial? Procedures for pauper's burials vary widely by jurisdiction. It is one of those little-discussed arenas of public health, a topic that often intersects with the deaths of the homeless.

Picture of Daniela  Velazquez

Daniela Velazquez wades through reams of data on childhood obesity in her community and lives to tell the tale.

Picture of Danielle Ivory

Who will be the winners and losers amid health reform's planned expansion of Medicaid? In her reporting, Danielle Ivory finds shifting power dynamics and unexpected financial risks for insurers. 

 

Picture of Daniela  Velazquez

When 11-year-old Shania Lape sees an overweight classmate struggle to keep up, she's filled with sympathy. "They can't run as fast, they can't play the games at school because they're not healthy," said Shania, a fifth-grader at Kenly Elementary in Tampa. Worse yet, not being able to play with their classmates could lead to a lifetime on the sidelines for some kids.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

When I set out to produce my fellowship series on prescription drug abuse in West Virginia, I already knew some grim statistics. Residents here are more likely than those of any other state to die of a prescription overdose. Because of high rates of chronic disease and occupational injuries, people in West Virginia also fill more prescriptions per capita than anywhere else.

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