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Food and Drug Administration

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For a growing number of Californians living near the border, Mexico offers what the United States does not: Reliable health care at an affordable price.
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Liz Szabo's USA Today story -- Doctor accused of selling false hope to families -- is one of the best medical investigations I have read. Here are a few lessons from the piece.

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Some years ago, I began hearing from my sources that I should investigate the generic drug industry. A generic drug boom was underway and it had led to a gold-rush mentality, they said. There seemed no good way into this nebulous topic, and no way to assess the actual quality of U.S. generic drugs.

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One billion dollars a year could be saved a year if Medicare adopted the VA's prescribing habits, according to a recent paper in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Are those eggs in your breakfast omelette safe to eat? 2011 National Health Journalism Fellow Jeff Kelly Lowenstein looks at the problems that led to the biggest egg recall in history.

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Dear Consumers: A disturbing trend has come to our attention. You, the people, are thinking more about health, and you’re starting to do something about it. This cannot continue.

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When the FDA says that a drug is approved to treat nearly 20 different diseases, you can assume the agency is right and that a true wonder drug is working miracles in the marketplace or examine the evidence.

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FDA advisory committee members berated the low numbers of fish used in salmon studies, the inclusion of irrelevant fish in studies which “diluted out the power of the study,” and the generally bad science.

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A new strategy to cripple Obamacare, a legal loss for contraception critics, EPA to review fire retardant toxicity and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Conflicts of interest in genetic counseling, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, TV dangers and more from our Daily Briefing.

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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