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Food deserts

Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Since 2016, more than a dozen grocery stores have closed citywide, often abandoning neighborhoods that already had some of the worst options for fresh food.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Last week, the Courier Journal published a series of stories that explored food access in Louisville. The articles showed how inadequate access to groceries can lead to health disparities in predominantly low-income neighborhoods.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Could the University of Louisville develop a research grocery store where students test business practices while residents have a place to shop?
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
Louisville neighborhoods without grocery stores have higher risks of developing illnesses. And it's costing us millions in emergency health care.
Picture of Lauren Weber
The first 1,000 days of nutrition can set a child’s course for life or perpetuate a cycle of poverty.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Through a fellowship with the USC Annenberg-Center for Health Journalism, we travel to LA and look at a program, which is helping ensure babies and parents are safe, healthy, and at the same time connecting them to other Native Americans in the big city.
Picture of Alexander Smith

Take a Saturday morning bike ride along the Kansas side of the state line and you’ll see plenty of people playing tennis, soccer and jogging in Johnson County. Ride a bit farther north to Wyandotte County, though, and it’s clear that outdoor recreation is a much rarer phenomenon.

Picture of Rio Holaday

The media tends to focus on national chains such as Target and Walmart that have taken steps to offer healthier products. But the work being done to improve small stores provides a great opportunity for reporters to tell local stories in underserved areas.

Picture of Taunya English

By 2012, when I started my fellowship project, several journalists -- in Philadelphia and nationally -- had written extensively about the “built environment,” food deserts and healthy food access. For my project, I looked to answer the question: “What else in a neighborhood matters to health?”

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

Even with major initiatives from such high-profile entities as the NFL and First Lady Michelle Obama pounding the message of exercising and healthy eating, childhood obesity in the U.S shows few signs of abating. Could more influential policy be the answer?

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As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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