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food insecurity

Picture of Sarah  Bohannon
For the survivors of the deadliest blaze in California history, the pandemic was a disaster upon a disaster. A reporter reflects on lessons learned while reporting on food insecurity after the 2018 blaze.
Picture of Sarah  Bohannon
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Sarah Bohannon, a participant in the Center for Health Journalism Impact Fund. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
With soaring unemployment, millions falling behind in rent and mile-long food bank lines, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a food and housing crisis of epic proportions.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
This story was produced as a project for the 2019 California Fellowship.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
The Courier Journal's continued coverage of food insecurity in Louisville is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism's 2018 National Fellowship.
Picture of Bailey Loosemore
A bag of local organic produce — from fresh corn to tomatoes to broccoli to snap peas — would typically cost more than $30 to buy at any store or farmers markets. But for workers at two Louisville companies, the same bag will cost just $5 this summer.

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Do you have a great idea for a potentially impactful reporting project on a health challenge in California?  Our 2020 Impact Fund can provide financial support and six months of mentoring.

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