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California emergency room doctors fight for their share of state money to treat the poor and uninsured, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Is your drugstore selling your prescription information to the pharma industry? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Why do so many Americans think health reform has been repealed? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Homicide humbled, orange juice investigated and 2012 health policy predicted, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Does the HIV "cure" recently reported in Germany live up to the hype it's getting? Answers and more from our Daily Briefing.

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Health reporters may be entering a season of scary airline food stories.

After years of paying too little attention to the quality and safety of food being served in airplanes, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been forced to take the issue more seriously.

Why?

Airline Food
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Here's what we're reading today:

Breast Cancer: Not fun, but it works: preemptively removing the ovaries or breasts of women who carry either of the two BRCA breast cancer genes can help save the women’s lives even if they’ve already been diagnosed with cancer, according to a new study. The Los Angeles Times’ Thomas H. Maugh has the story.

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Here’s what we’re reading today:

Hospital Bribery? A California man has been charged with bribery for trying to entice a hospital employee to accept would-be doctors into hard-to-get medical residency slots, according to a story in The Wall St. Journal. He allegedly paid the employee $15,000 as incentive. His lawyer calls him a “very generous guy.”

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Here’s what we’re reading and watching today:

Air Quality: Here’s one instance where wealth isn’t linked to health: ScienceDaily reports on a study finding that homes in both poor and affluent California communities had similarly high levels of endocrine disruptors. These disruptors can affect the endocrine system and lead to fertility and infant development problems among other health risks.

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