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Picture of Beatrice Motamedi

Interviews with and writings by nearly 100 students at the Castlemont Campus of Small Schools reveal three major stressors jeopardize their health: academic anxiety, lack of healthy food and an environment that limits their freedom and imprisons them indoors. Even more alarming, factors such as a poor diet and lack of nutrition can lead to health problems that can be passed on to future generations, researchers say.

Picture of Christopher Weber

Startup companies bet locally sourced fish, produced in self-sustaining habitats, can win over city-dwellers

Picture of Lisa Jones

The construction of a dam near an Indian reservation on the Missouri River forced residents to less fertile land and put an end to their farming habits. Since then, American Indians have experienced a lack of nutrition, leading to diabetes, hypertension and obesity.

Picture of Mary Otto

If you want to know how tough someone’s life has been, look inside his mouth. Teeth are made of the hardest substance in the human body. But poverty, neglect and disease can crack them, break them, ruin them. The patients at the SOME dental clinic on O Street NW have been through a lot. Their teeth tell the story.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

While funding for California's welfare programs has seen a steady decline over the past few decades, the state's financial crisis may mean even more severe cutbacks. Many who depend on these programs may face homelessness and illness as a result.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The high cost of environmentally-linked disease in children, a new interactive map for finding "food deserts" and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

California's Central Valley has by far the highest agricultural production in the country. But those who work the land often don't benefit from the fresh fruits and vegetables they harvest.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Who knew that Tennessee had the highest percentage (41%) of high school kids who drank more than one sugary soda a day? Check out these story ideas from a new CDC state-by-state report on “food environments” for children.

Picture of Daniela  Velazquez

Daniela Velazquez wades through reams of data on childhood obesity in her community and lives to tell the tale.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. David C. Martin may be onto something. In three Antidote posts last week, he made the case that health care workers should not wear surgical scrubs out in public. If seen doing so, they should be confronted. Now, doctors are talking back. 

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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