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Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Is your drugstore selling your prescription information to the pharma industry? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

There is a world of difference in how districts provide healthy school lunches. One key difference is money—both the income levels of school districts and the cost of lunch programs. Another is the food culture of diverse communities, so to speak, and what kids and their families are used to eating. In districts like Oakland, which participate in the federally and state subsidized lunch programs, the nutrition services have just $2.74 per meal to deliver a lunch that meets guidelines--and that kids will want to eat. Affluent districts such as Orinda don't participate in the subsidized lunch program and may serve catered lunches that are a lot like food they would eat at home.

Picture of Heather May

Utah County's blogging "asthma mom" offers tips to help people avoid attack triggers. It is a sidebar to the third part of May's series on health disparities in Salt Lake City.

Picture of Marice Ashe

With escalating obesity rates and growing interest in “buying local,” it’s a prime moment for health reporters to shine a light on how local government leaders can build momentum for a strategy many communities have long ignored.

Picture of William Heisel

When I wrote about the “Dieting Sucks” campaign two years ago, I predicted that similarly unscrupulous plastic surgeons would join the race to the bottom. They did.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Prescription drug costs continue to climb for West Virginia, despite efforts to rein them in.

Picture of Emily Hagedorn

As drug-related deaths continue to rise, state funding for patient outreach is on the decline. This story is part of a series that examines prescription drug abuse in Kentucky.

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

From greener school lunches to required nutritional information printed on fast-food menus, it's clear that state and federal governments are urging Americans to take control of their health -- starting with food. This is part four in a four-part series.

Part one: Convenience often trumps nutrition

Part two: Committed to nutrition

Part three: Providing healthier choices

 

Picture of Yesenia Amaro

In an effort to promote healthier eating habits among students, Merced County school officials are eliminating foods high in fat from school meal offerings and replacing them with fruits, vegetables and other nutritious alternatives. This is part three in a four-part series.

Part one: Convenience often trumps nutrition

Part two: Committed to nutrition

Part four: No escape from healthy lifestyle effort

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 8 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Gary resident Teresa Johnson said she recognizes the woman in the “before” pictures and remembers her pain.

Johnson, 50, who worked with developmentally disabled adults in Lake and Porter counties before becoming disabled, said she has been overweight all her life.

“I had very little success losing weight on my own,” she said. “I’d lose weight and then gain it right back. But last year I needed a knee replacement surgery and didn’t want to have it while I was still morbidly obese.”

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