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Picture of Annette Fuentes

Bay Area school nutrition directors say higher nutrition standards are good, but expensive.

Picture of Linnie Frank Bailey

Health care, education, politics, and pride take a back seat when you have no shelter.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Does the HIV "cure" recently reported in Germany live up to the hype it's getting? Answers and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Ken sleeps under a sheltered overhang in the Financial District, an area full of sun-glinting towers and chic lunchtime hot-spots. Our own map of the Top 100 restaurants shows a hefty number clustered there,

Picture of Megha Satyanarayana

If you think you speak a language, and you weren't born speaking it, you *don't* really know it.

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

California's Central Valley grows fruits and vegetables for the whole country, employing farm workers to care for and harvest the produce. But the recession and drought conditions have forced farm workers out of work, and now many of them are in need of food aid.

Picture of Alicia DeLeon-Torres

Pureza Bacor recalls the Filipino father, a single parent, who called at 4:55 p.m. on a Friday afternoon. He spoke in hushed tones and in near tears. “Do you speak Tagalog? I can speak in English but what I need to say, I can’t express myself right in English. I need to speak to someone who speaks to Tagalog,” pleaded the father.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Studies show that many people faced with home loss and housing uncertainty can take a tremendous hit to their health. If you're going through difficult times, and worried you too may lose your home, what can you do to try to buffer or reclaim your health?

Here are some tips for ways to counteract some of the toll that constant stress (and the insomnia, distraction and desperation that go with it) can take on your health:

Picture of Alicia DeLeon-Torres

At 18 years old, my mother took me to play bingo at a local American Indian reservation. It was a bare hall, lined with long rows of tables and filled with mostly middle aged women. My mother bought eight cards - 4 for her and 4 for me. The woman next to me had 32 cards enclosed in a perimeter of lucky trinkets. I remember thinking, "she's got a problem". The woman listened intently, then marked her cards quickly and with conviction. At several points, I lagged behind in marking my cards. My mom was no better. We were novices. The woman next to us looked annoyed.

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