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Picture of Jane Stevens

There aren’t enough therapists in the world to help the hundreds of millions of people who suffer complex trauma. But one former pastor is tackling the topic in his own community.

Picture of Collin Tong

A coalition of local and global health groups have banded together to bring the lessons they've learned in developing countries to south King County, where the health index is as bad as Nairobi.

Picture of William Heisel

How culpable is an international food conglomerate for the waistlines of kids in your neighborhood?

Picture of Kate Long

Journalist Kate Long examines how some West Virginians are changing their lifestyles to drop pounds and reduce their risk of diabetes and other obesity-related diseases. West Virginia has one of the highest chronic disease rates in the nation.

Picture of Kate Long

Until the 1980s, few West Virginians are overweight in archival photos. In the 1960s and 1970s, during the poverty war, Americans got used to seeing pictures of bone-thin West Virginians on the evening news. Only 13.4 percent of Americans were obese then.

Picture of Kate Long

Experts have advised West Virginia to establish statewide diabetes management programs. Dannie Cunningham can testify that they work.

Picture of Kate Long

West Virginia is among the top five states on just about every national chronic disease list. Journalist Kate Long investigates what's behind the state's poor showing.

Picture of Jane Stevens

Project Unbreakable is a powerful combination of social media, photography and storytelling. But Grace Brown calls it "art therapy" for those who need to heal.

Picture of Elizabeth Baier

Inside a crumbling trailer in Northfield, Samantha Castro Flores shows off a closet bursting with clothes. Sometimes she can't find a size of pants that fits.

Picture of Pamela  Johnson

Following breadcrumbs of curiosity, I found a number of articles and reports on food-access issues in Chicago, Detroit, Cincinnati, Nashville, Louisville, Philadelphia, Binghamton, New York, and beyond.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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