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Picture of Gergana Koleva

Sodas, sports drinks, and other sugar-sweetened beverages appear less tempting to consumers when labels show caloric information in terms of minutes of jogging rather than as absolute calorie counts, new research from two leading public health universities suggests.

Picture of Elaine Schattner

The December issue of Wired Mag­azine pro­files David Kirchhoff, CEO of Weight Watchers, in a story on new ways to measure calories and food. It’s an inter­esting piece, with several points worth con­tem­plating at the start of the year.

Picture of Lisa Aliferis

The Los Angeles Times examines the apparent failure of the city's much-touted healthier school lunch program, which appears to be a "flop" with students. Journalist Lisa Aliferis says the program may be more successful than anyone realizes.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

I had been researching pieces of the topic of my National Health Journalism Fellowship project, the challenges to healthy eating for low-income Bostonians, for more than a year before I started. Here's what I learned, from challenges to surprises.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Three out of four Americans want government to do something to curb overuse of antibiotics on animal farms that supply most of the nation’s meat, and many believe the resulting rise of antibiotic-resistant superbugs is a serious threat to human health, Gergana Koleva reports.

Picture of Angilee Shah

From Adweek's annual Hot List, this week in Career GPS we look for health-related jobs in thriving media outlets.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

A Dorchester shelter works to transition women and their families to permanent housing through job training and education assistance, and also works to develop other skills like parenting and nutrition. In addition, these women have the opportunity to work on an urban farm.

Picture of Caitlin Buysse (Kandil)

Despite those unhealthy calories, some fast food restaurants offer something rare in urban communities -- a clean and convenient place to hang out.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Today's news roundup features the good and the bad in the fight against AIDS, health questions about food in cans, and a book for your long weekend. The Daily Briefing will go offline until Monday, so we sign off with some (health-related) Thanksgiving reads.

Picture of Jane Stevens

Contrary to popular belief, resilience is not innate. If you stress a child long enough and don't provide any nurturing to recover from the stress, research shows that the effects are damaging and long-term.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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