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Fresno

Picture of Soreath Hok
For many in the community, the temple provides a place to heal from the past and supports community well-being.
Picture of Cassandra Garibay
Transportation and information barriers make cooling centers difficult to access for many people living on the streets or in cars.
Picture of Danielle Bergstrom
“If the bus is running late, that makes me late, you know,” one resident said. “For my important things I have to do, I have no choice.”
Picture of Laura Tsutsui
At Saint Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, all of the hospital’s employees get violence prevention and awareness training, but those who work in the emergency department get more.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
"The community engagement process pushed me out of my reporting comfort zone, and not only led to new sources but strengthened the relationships I had with previous sources," writes Fresno Bee reporter Mackenzie Mays.
Picture of Kerry Klein
Knowing this one simple truth can help areas experiencing physician shortages: Where doctors grew up can predict where they practice, but where they are trained is one of the biggest drivers.
Picture of Kerry Klein
While access to insurance coverage remains a national debate, in the San Joaquin Valley, getting to see a doctor isn’t always easy, even for people who have coverage.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
Before the California Healthy Youth Act went into effect last year, Fresno Unified was one of a few school districts that didn’t teach comprehensive sex education and pushback against such lessons remains.
Picture of Mackenzie Mays
The story is the first in a series about sex education and teen pregnancy in the central San Joaquin Valley, and is produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship....
Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall
After living there for over a decade, I know San Francisco is uniquely situated when it comes to HIV and AIDS. But I wondered, How are other counties in California fairing in their prevention efforts?

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Announcements

The Center for Health Journalism’s 2023 National Fellowship will provide $2,000 to $10,000 reporting grants, five months of mentoring from a veteran journalist, and a week of intensive training at USC Annenberg in Los Angeles from July 16-20. Click here for more information and the application form, due May 5.

The Center for Health Journalism’s 2023 Symposium on Domestic Violence provides reporters with a roadmap for covering this public health epidemic with nuance and sensitivity. The next session will be offered virtually on Friday, March 31. Journalists attending the symposium will be eligible to apply for a reporting grant of $2,000 to $10,000 from our Domestic Violence Impact Reporting Fund. Find more info here!

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