Skip to main content.

Georgia

Picture of Rebecca Lindstrom
With the passage of the Mental Health Parity Act, insurers are required to provide equal coverage for behavioral health care.
Picture of Rebecca Lindstrom
A mom reaches out to thank lawmakers for their support of mental health reform, as her daughter sits in a crisis stabilization unit for the 17th time.
Picture of Rebecca Lindstrom
One mom told me, “I love my son. I love him so much but it’s like, am I the best thing for him?"
Picture of Timothy  Pratt
How Georgia’s system to teach children with disabilities is falling vastly short of its promise.
Picture of Timothy  Pratt

One parent referred to Georgia's 46-year-old system for segregating children diagnosed with emotional and behavioral disabilities as “a warehouse for kids the school system doesn't want or know how to deal with.”

Picture of Virginia Lynne Anderson

Studies show that children who live with grandparents or other relatives typically fare better than children in foster care, but at what cost? Many say they are ill equipped and burnt out trying to be social workers, nurses and therapists for their vulnerable charges.

Picture of Virginia Lynne Anderson

About 128,000 children in Georgia and an estimated 103,000 grandparents and other non-parental relatives could be affected by legislation scheduled to be introduced this week by Rep. Stacey Abrams (D-DeKalb) and others.

Picture of Lee Adcock

When private wells are properly installed and maintained, they are usually clean and reliable sources of water – but not always.

Picture of Thomas Corwin

Mental health patients and the developmentally disabled are some of the most vulnerable people in our society and unfortunately, even with the best of intentions, the system can let them down.

Picture of Johanes Rosello

Reporter Johanes Roselló spent four months interviewing families who’d been affected by the deportation of a father or spouse. Their stories were heartbreaking, frustrating and inspiring. Here are some lessons and suggestions for others considering similar projects.

Pages

Announcements

The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth