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Georgia,United States

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Concern refills the lives of more than thirty dialysis patients in Atlanta. They are reaching the date will no longer receive the treatment that keeps them alive. On 31 August contract expires on Grady Hospital signed with Fresenius private clinic for further treatment of these patients, mostly illegal immigrants.
Picture of Linda Perez
Throughout this year, in which the former Grady dialysis patients have been compromised treatment, several people have supported. However, there are allegations that the aid of the Hispanic community is almost nil.
Picture of R. Jan Gurley

First, it was the opening of a Kroger in East Oakland. Now it's the announcement that Tesco's Fresh and Easy is heading to the Bayview. What exactly, you may be asking yourself, makes these stories major headline news?

And why is a doctor spending time writing about grocery stores too?

Picture of Linda Perez

A group of 30 end-stage renal patients of Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta, face death as their dialysis treatment is scheduled to be cut soon. Many of these patients are undocumented Latino immigrants who do not have insurance and do not qualify for public benefits. Their immigration status has been a barrier to find alternative care and they are running out of options.

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Luckily for Dr. Dan Stephen Hollis, an Alabama ophthalmologist, medical boards rarely see selling drugs over the Internet in the same way that police officers see selling drugs in the street.

 

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Even the predawn day began a little differently. The shrill distant stadium cheers of hundreds of Haitian roosters sounded oddly synchronized, as though perhaps they were doing the wave. There were more dogs keeping the beat with incessant, rhythmic barking.

Picture of Suzanne Bohan

While reporting for a four-part series on the wide gap in life expectancies and disease rates between people in nearby neighborhoods – due to drastically different conditions and social status – I expected to find that health care reform legislation would do little to address this issue. The reform legislation, after all, is primarily about health care insurance. But I was surprised to find that, for the first time, Congressional legislation contains at least $3.4 billion to focus on improving health disparities.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. Patrick Dean has pulled off a magic trick to make Houdini proud.

The founder and president of GI Pathology, a national testing laboratory based in Memphis, Dean has practiced medicine without a license in at least two states. Practicing without a license is often a career killer for a physician. Not so with Dean.

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

This post describes the Dart Society reunion I attended last month. Named after eminent psychiatrist Dr. Frank Ochberg, he fellows supports journalists who cover issues of trauma and violence to help them both tells stories about those issues with sensitivity and compassion and to deal with the emotional consequences of doing that work.

Picture of William Heisel

Justina Wang at the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle tackled a topic that seems to scare most local publications: food safety.

With each food poisoning scare, local reporters cover what's happening at their corner stores. Few examine the root causes. With school board meetings, octuplet moms and a weekender due tomorrow, how could one possibly get to the bottom of our fractured food safety system?

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