Skip to main content.

global warming

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Reporters Tony Barboza and Anna Phillips take us behind the scenes of their yearlong investigation.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
Molly is one of the recipients of the 2018 Impact Fund, a program of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism....
Picture of Molly  Peterson
Molly is one of the recipients of the 2018 Impact Fund, a program of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Chinyere Amobi
We recently spoke with Brenda Woods-Placky, director of the Climate Matters program at Climate Central, to discuss how journalists can best report on the science and health impact of climate change.
Picture of Jamie Hopkins
"There exists a class of hyper-polluters — the worst-of-the-worst — that disproportionately expose communities of color and low income populations to chemical releases," researchers write in a 2016 paper.
Picture of Linda Marsa

Subtle changes in the climate -- warmer winters, wetter and earlier springs, and greener environments because of more rainfall -- contribute to increasing pest populations. Sometimes deadly pathogens hosted by these vectors are now moving to warming regions, too.

Picture of Linda Marsa

In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina, both New York City and New Orleans came up with a suite of innovative strategies aimed at making their public health systems more resilient and flexible in a disaster.

Picture of Linda Marsa

Hurricanes pose a tremendous threat to our coastal cities, which are home to nearly half the nation’s population. As the mercury continues to climb, the intensity and frequency of hurricanes has been the subject of intense debate within scientific circles.

Picture of Linda Marsa

Prolonged hot streaks can wither crops, buckle roads, cause train derailments when metal tracks warp in the heat, and trigger power outages because of the high demand for electricity. But the most profound effect of unflaggingly high temperatures is on our health.

Picture of Linda Marsa

If climate models that predict steady warming prove accurate, deadly wildfires stand to increase in intensity and frequency across the U.S. More research is needed to understand their impact on our health.

Pages

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth