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Picture of R. Jan Gurley

As patient satisfaction surveys become more important to how doctors get paid, Doc Gurley finds them to be easily gamed and lacking in statistical validity — creating problems for both doctors and their patients.

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Veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman shares tips for localizing the highly politicized debate over Medicare.

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States cut back on HIV/AIDS drugs for the poor, Nevada's smoking ban lowers heart attacks and stroke, and a Medicaid success story, plus more in our Daily Briefing.

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A study shows dentists leery of treating kids with Medicaid insurance, budget woes for frail patients in California, and an update on Joplin's tornado-ravaged hospital, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

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The CDC "is prepared" for a zombie apocalypse, hospitals exaggerate the safety of robot surgery, emergency room closings and more from our Daily Briefing. 

Picture of Angilee Shah

A columnist calls for a more "humane" health care spending plan, a seventh-grader tries to start a lunch revolution, and food prices are going up for lots of unexpected reasons as we close out the week in the Daily Briefing.

Picture of Angilee Shah

A new database of health care costs, praise for Millenials and doctors in Libya, in today's Daily Briefing.

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Fearful mental health workers, high hospital charges, and crazy movie theater soft drink sizes, plus more in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

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