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Picture of William Heisel

The new report about the criminal histories of nursing home workers from the Office of Inspector General for Department of Health and Human Services has prompted many bold statements. What has been missing from all the alarmist analyses of this report are a few key facts and a sense of perspective.

 

Picture of William Heisel

The biggest finding in a new report about the criminal histories of nursing home workers is that the Office of Inspector General can’t say whether seniors and people with disabilities truly are in danger.

 

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 7 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Indiana.

Every dollar invested in a community health center yields returns beyond that investment, said an official of the association representing such centers in Indiana.

“Not only do we provide care to people without access to health services, but we improve the economy,” said Phil Morphew, chief executive officer of the Indiana Primary Care Association.

 

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

President Obama’s support for a bill that would let states opt out of national health reform mandates early to come up with their own plans has been described variously as “a bomb,” a “major concession” to reform’s critics, or “calling the Republicans’ bluff.”  

But is it any single one of these things? Not so much. Here’s some context and a look at some analysis of Obama’s highly-publicized support for the Wyden-Brown state waiver bill, which he announced to the nation’s state governors on Monday.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

The nation's drug-policy chief says West Virginia can fight its prescription drug abuse epidemic by combining good police work with a focus on the prevention and treatment of substance abuse.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Getting ready for a huge study of the Gulf oil spill's affects on human health, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

When Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal, announced it was suing to gain access to information about individual providers in the Medicare claims database, investigative reporters everywhere started salivating.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

California scored in the lowest quartile among all states in its health care system's provision of services for children in a new Commonwealth Fund report, and the reasons behind it have very much to do with budget priorities. But there are also the complex issues of immigration and access to care that are not so easily resolved.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

A Commonwealth Fund survey compares the states on childrens' health care access and treatment, and California ranks in the bottom quartile.

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