Skip to main content.

gun violence

Picture of Dan Levin
This project was produced by Dan Levin as part of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2020 National Fellowship.
Picture of Nada Hassanein
"Our kids aren’t growing up, you know. They’re dying. They’re dying too fast," says Koquisha Cook, who lost her daughter in an August shooting.
Picture of Ginny Monk
Arkansas child gun-death rate among nation's 10 highest. Toddler Tacari Briggs was one of the youngest.
By Brian Malte
Active shooter drills have consequences and so does the influx of school resource officers – especially in urban schools.
Picture of Sonali Kohli
"They come in welled up with emotion, they’re crying and there’s no way they can concentrate on the lesson at hand," says a teacher at Dymally High School in South Los Angeles.
Picture of Richard Lord
This story was produced as part of a larger project, "Growing Up through the Cracks," led by Rich Lord, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship.
Picture of Jonetta Barras
This video was produced as a project supported by the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the University of Southern California Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Richard Lord
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Rich Lord, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship.
Picture of Brie Zeltner
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
This article and others forthcoming on this topic are being produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Other stories in this series includ

Pages

Announcements

Join us for a webinar on the crisis for women, the disproportionate burdens on women of color, and the short-and long-term consequences of the mass exodus of women from workforce. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the Uited States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

COVID-19 has made every journalist a health reporter, whether their usual beat is crime, education or county government.  Our 2021 California Fellowship will make anyone who attends a better health reporter -- and give you a reporting grant of $2,000-$10,000 and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project. Deadline to apply: March 1.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth