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Picture of Rishi Manchanda

Innovative providers understand health is more than a chemical equation that can be balanced with pills and procedures. They see that health begins in our everyday lives, in the places where we live, work, eat, and play.

Picture of William Heisel

What's an 87-year-old doctor to do when he's banned from performing surgery but still allowed to practice medicine? Prescribe medical marijuana in a dubious clinic.

Picture of Sunita Sohrabji

Physician Rishi Manchanda’s epiphany – to develop a new think tank aimed at improving health care for the poor - came last summer as he was treating a patient complaining of severe headaches.

Picture of Victoria Schlesinger

Decision makers in Sacramento have 4 months to settle their differences about the state's chemical regulations

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Prescription drug abuse is growing nationwide, but West Virginia was one of the first places hit by the problem. When I picked this topic, I didn't realize how complex it was. The drugs are widely available. Doctors are struggling to treat pain with effective medications without supplying drug abusers. And prescription drug crimes have proven difficult to prosecute.

This is the second in a four-part series examining prescription drug abuse in West Virginia.

 

Picture of Adriana Venegas-Chavez

Part 2: Researchers trying to find why people with disease fail to act against it. 

Picture of William Heisel

Initiative 1000, the so-called "Death with Dignity Act," took effect in Washington state on March 5, after being approved by voters in November. And it has put hospitals in a strange position. Hospitals are considered the place where doctors and staff do everything in their power to keep a person alive. Now hospitals are being asked to allow their patients to kill themselves.

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This year saw a scorcher of a summer, the hottest on record. Worse, it could be the coldest summer we’ll see in our lifetimes. In this webinar, we’ll glean lessons and insights from a yearlong Los Angeles Times investigation into extreme heat. We’ll also identify gaps in state and federal tracking efforts, and outline policy changes that could help. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

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