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health care quality

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Advocates warn that people who need nursing care may increasingly be sent far away from San Francisco in a developing shortage of affordable nursing home beds.
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The recent news that Armstrong’s death in 2012 may have been due to complications from a medical procedure was big news for history buffs, space fans, and investigative reporters. Here's why.
Picture of Luanne Rife
Even Ballad Health’s most ardent supporters are frustrated with the health care system’s seeming failure to respond to concerns about patient care.
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Democrats and Republicans on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce have asked the leader of the Indian Health Service to address two investigations that highlighted serious lapses in the agency’s care for Native Americans.
Picture of Michelle Levander
Californians remain without a scorecard to track the performance of Medicaid provider groups, and state officials don't seem eager to change that.
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A yearlong effort to obtain basic Medicaid provider data in L.A. was rebuffed. Some health care leaders shut their doors gently. Others slammed them shut.
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The U.S. spends more than any other country for health care. And economic ideals that should push costs down aren't actually working in our country's system.
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Amid talk of ACA repeal, the signs suggest that the new Congress and president will diminish the emphasis on value-based health care. Here's what reporters should keep in mind.
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The goal of health care spending is to achieve good health results, and that requires measuring and rewarding success. Unfortunately, the measures likely to be used for the next stage of health reform won’t get us there.

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IUDs are safer than doctors think, autism diagnosis up, cancer diagnosis down, speculating on health reform and more from our Daily Briefing.

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Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the Uited States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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