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health care reform

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The GOP's health care reforms would leave millions without insurance, and Florida could be hit harder than many other states. As a result, the Sunshine State's free clinics are gearing up for a wave of new patients.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
"We are now in another war of words over health care," writes Trudy Lieberman, "and the first casualty, as in any war, is always truth." For examples, look no further than the recent dialogue on Medicare.
Picture of Ted B. Kissell

In California, Certified Enrollment Counselors fill a role under the Affordable Care Act similar to the one that’s often described as a “navigator” on a national level. But under Covered California, CECs and navigators are not the same thing.

Picture of Michelle Levander

During our five-day program, we will tackle topics ranging from the country’s historic health care expansion to health and homelessness.

Picture of Anthony Advincula

Diabetes-related deaths have reached an all-time high in New York City, and communities of color are being hit the hardest.

Picture of CALLIE  SHANAFELT

Undocumented immigrants and lawfully present immigrants who’ve been here less than five years are the largest group excluded from health-care reform.  They are not eligible to purchase insurance through the state exchanges and will continue to be excluded from Medicaid....

Picture of Heather Boerner

It's difficult for Norma Navarro to explain to her children why they get different treatment -- one was born in the U.S. and the other is undocumented. With implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the gap between their treatment may continue to grow.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

Philadelphia has the highest obesity rate and poorest population of America’s big cities. It also has an ambitious plan to put healthy food on every table.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

In need of some comic relief amid all the Serious and Important coverage of the Supreme Court's hearings on the Affordable Care Act this week? Check out these health reform parodies.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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