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Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Community violence and a visit to the doctor might seem unrelated. But for people living in violent communities, and the police who patrol them, it's often more closely related than people think.
Picture of Becca  Aaronson

A Texas GOP plan to exclude 40 Planned Parenthood clinics from the state's Texas Woman’s Health Program has lead to fewer claims for birth control and wellness exams as well as lower overall enrollment numbers.

Picture of Kimber Solana

It’s a Medicare reform idea that seems pretty straightforward, and for proponents on both sides of the political aisle, a fair-minded approach to solving the entitlement program’s funding woes -- make more financially well-heeled Medicare beneficiaries foot more of the bill for their care....

Picture of Kimber Solana

Sophia, 44, works up to 40 hours per week at a Mexican restaurant in Gurnee, Ill., making $10 an hour. With every paycheck, she said, $136 goes to payroll taxes, $62 of which goes to Social Security and Medicare. But as an undocumented immigrant, she will never receive those entitlements.

Picture of Kate  Benson

With only 17 to 18 percent of NIH grant applications funded this year - the lowest level on record - are RCTs costing millions, cost effective?

Picture of Angilee Shah

A new database of health care costs, praise for Millenials and doctors in Libya, in today's Daily Briefing.

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This story is Part 14 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

When Shantray Hooks, of Gary, lost her job as a restaurant cook in August, she didn’t know how she would pay for doctor visits.

“I had no health insurance and I couldn’t afford to pay a doctor,” said Hooks, 29, who was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago.

A doctor referred her to the Community Health Net of Gary, a federally qualified community health center that provides comprehensive primary care health services and charges on a sliding fee scale for services.

Picture of Mark Taylor

This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

Picture of Bernice Yeung

A growing national movement seeks to connect ex-offenders with health care services. Many people say it makes financial sense. Some say it can possibly reduce crime.

Picture of Suzanne Bohan

On Sunday, a four-part series a year in the making runs in the Bay Area News Group. As the science reporter for the chain, I teamed with health reporter Sandy Kleffman to report and write this series.

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The pandemic has thrown into brutal relief the extent to which the U.S. health care system produces worse outcomes for patients of color. And yet there has been scant focus on one of the biggest drivers of structural racism in health care: How doctors and hospitals are paid. In this webinar, we’ll highlight the ways in which the health care system’s focus on money and good grades is shortchanging the health of communities of color. Sign-up here!

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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