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Health care in the United States

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Sandy Kleffman

Some non-profit hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area receive millions of dollars in tax breaks each year to care for the poor and uninsured, yet they provide only a fraction of local charity care. Sandy Kleffman reports.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

As the health reform law nears its two-year anniversary, I will be using my Dennis A. Hunt Fund award to report a three-part series on the challenges and opportunities of reform law’s preventive programs, examining whether new approaches and bolstered funding are paying dividends at the ground level.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A little legwork can deliver compelling stories about how cancer treatment costs are affecting patients in your community, whether they’re  insured or not. Here are some tips and resources to jump-start your reporting.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Who wants to take care of a patient who is statistically likely to rate you poorly when your payment for services is based on that same rating? Doc Gurley examines the role of race and racism in patient satisfaction ratings.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Here are tips on getting ready to cover health reform's rollout in your community.

Picture of Michael Stoll

The San Francisco Public Press, a startup news organization doing public-affairs reporting in the Bay Area, is producing an in-depth explanatory project examining the track record of a city-sponsored health care program called Healthy San Francisco.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

A Commonwealth Fund survey compares the states on childrens' health care access and treatment, and California ranks in the bottom quartile.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A new study of nutrition labeling at one fast food chain finds Americans just don't care, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Yvonne LaRose

Does anyone remember receiving healthcare in the 1960s? Everyone had affordable health insurance through their employer. All of the family was covered. Doctor visits were scheduled by whoever was in need of the care. That means, even if you were a 16-year-old and had the flu, you could still

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