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Health Care

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Is health reform to "blame" for sea changes in San Francisco's experiment in universal access to health care for city residents? Learn more and get tips for reporting on health reform in your own community.

Picture of Barbara Grady

What one journalist learned while reporting on San Francisco's program to provide access to health care for all of its residents.

Picture of Angilee Shah

My first panel at SXSW wasn't a whiz-bang-gadget conversation, but one that spurred great thinking on communities that don't necessarily have access to high-speed broadband Internet.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

Journalist Sarah Kliff looks at the monumental task of bringing enough primary care doctors online by 2015 — a key factor in health reform's success.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The Congressional supercommittee's failure to reach a deal could spell even harder times for health providers and agencies, from hospitals to AIDS treatment programs to doctors who treat Medicare patients. Here's a roundup of the analysis.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

The realm of AIDS/HIV and its prevalence in the African-American community is not one that has gone untouched, yet the problem continues to get worse. A new CEHJF Fellow describes her upcoming reporting project.

Picture of Michael Stoll

The San Francisco Department of Public Health says it is ahead of the curve in rolling out databases that keep tabs on tens of thousands of patients across a citywide network of clinics and hospitals.

Picture of Michael Stoll

Most participants in Healthy San Francisco, the city’s 2007 initiative to expand care to more than 50,000 uninsured patients, appreciate the overall access to preventative care and treatment for chronic health conditions.

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Do you have a great idea for a potentially impactful reporting project on a health challenge in California?  Our 2020 Impact Fund can provide financial support and six months of mentoring.

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