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Health Care

Picture of Timothy  Darragh

Like fashion and football, health care has its trends. And one of the bigger trends now is “hot-spotting,” the practice of using data to identify those who are the “super utilizers” of the health care system and surrounding them with services in an attempt to cut health care spending. ...

Picture of Rubén Tapia

Una mujer decidió por su cuenta convertir su casa en centro de inscripción. Invitó a sus familiares y vecinos, en su mayoría desasegurados, que estaban indecisos sobre si inscribirse o pagar la multa. ¿Podría ser un modelo a replicar para inscribir a más latinos?

Picture of Rubén Tapia

A Mexican-American woman decided to convert her house into a health insurance registration center. She invited her family and neighbors, most of them uninsured. Could this be a model strategy to sign up more Latinos?

Picture of Annabelle Sedano

An estimated 400,000 people end up in one of the 250 detention centers across the United States annually -- the majority being Hispanic.

Picture of Ryan White

Has your child has his tonsils removed or head scanned lately? Whether or not you said yes may have something to do with where you call home. That variation in care is raising some red flags.

Picture of Collin Tong

Village Health Works has rebuilt a war-torn Burundian village, teaching community members who used to kill each other to instead care for one another. Seattle's global health community is on board.

Picture of Susan  Abram

The Affordable Care Act requires health plans to provide mental health services. That means the newly insured will have the option to seek care anywhere they want. This has thrust publicly run mental health clinics into a new landscape of competition.

Picture of Sandra Hausman

The U.S. locks up more individuals per capita than any other country in the world. We have 2.2 million people behind bars – up 500% from 30 years ago. This situation raises important questions for policy makers, and it’s a rich area for journalistic exploration.

Picture of Ryan White

New technologies and alternative forms of care can help low-income patients feel more informed about their health. But all of those services can’t compete with the ultimate trump card: the doctor/patient relationship.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

Mental health providers in Illinois acknowledge that the state is in a dire budget situation. They say they have become more resourceful, finding ways to continue serving their patients and hope that the Affordable Care Act will help their situation.

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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