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health policy

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Medicare might seem like a national story, but it isn’t exclusively the province of Beltway reporters. Like all health care, it’s local.

Picture of Courtney McNamara

While reactions to Bloomberg’s soda ban continue to effervesce, those truly concerned with the public’s health would be well advised to hold their praise.

Picture of Jeff  Kelly Lowenstein

Sixty-seven percent of Hispanic women and seventy-five percent of Latino men in Chicago who work full time, were uninsured in 2009, according to the analysis of today. These figures were much lower than that recorded full-time workers whites, blacks and Asians.

Picture of Ryan White

If you could do one thing to ensure that you had a long, healthy life, what would you do? If you have less than a high school degree at 25, you can expect to live another 44 years, on average. Those with a graduate degree, however, can expect to live another 60 years, on average.

Picture of Anna Gorman

The patients call it simply “the clinic.”  It’s where they go to get their kids’ shots for school.  It’s where they get check-ups and medication for their high blood pressure. It’s where they get advice on finding jobs or apartments....

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Unnecessary angioplasties, friendlier relations between insurers and care providers, hospitals that cater to the patient rather than focusing purely on the disease, and more from our Daily Briefing. 

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Is health reform to "blame" for sea changes in San Francisco's experiment in universal access to health care for city residents? Learn more and get tips for reporting on health reform in your own community.

Picture of Gary Schwitzer

Like our HealthNewsReview.org project, this Canadian project offers a list of industry-independent experts - and more.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

Over the weekend, I took a long look at what the health-reform law does to address a looming shortage of primary care doctors. And the short answer is: Not much.

Picture of Farida Jhabvala

Radio journalist Farida Jhabvala examines how one facet of health reform might help uninsured families in Fresno, California's poorest county - but political leaders there don't want to participate.

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Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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