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health reform

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The only way to insure everyone at a reasonable cost is to make sure everyone — healthy and sick — is in the risk pool together. The House GOP plan won't achieve that goal.
Picture of Steven Weissman

In 1964 healthcare was one-third the cost of an average family’s housing and utility bills. Today, healthcare is equal to housing and utility bills.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The historic defeat sent a signal to politicians that everyone needs health coverage, comprehensive benefits, and sick people can’t be left out.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Conservative notions about the "undeserving poor" have returned with a vengeance in the debate over Medicaid, writes contributor Trudy Lieberman.
Picture of Michael Lighty
Is transforming California into a single-payer health care system a moonshot? Not according to proponents such as gubernatorial hopeful Gavin Newsom or the California Nurses Association.
Picture of Ryan White
“It’s nuts in Washington right now,” said Noam Levey of The Los Angeles Times. So, how does a local reporter tackle this huge national health policy story?
Picture of Ryan White
How has the Affordable Care Act changed life in the ER, and what might the new Republican plan signal for safety net hospitals? The LAC+USC Medical Center offers some clues.
Picture of Ryan White
The Republican health bill could usher in major cuts to California's Medicaid program, even while offering more flexibility. Could the state use that newfound flexibility to overhaul its health care system?
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The failures of the national conversation during the run-up to Obamacare's passage are now hastening its demise, with too few Americans seeing firsthand benefits.
Picture of Gary Schwitzer
The ACA has become a scapegoat in the media for all kinds of health care woes. "Somebody needs to be the referee on some of the cheap shots flying around on an uneven playing field," says Health News Review's Gary Schwitzer.

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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