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Health

Picture of Erin Schumaker
When neighborhoods change, it doesn’t just affect long-term residents’ housing options. It might be making them sick.
Picture of Sarah Gustavus
In the final installment of their series “Re-connecting with a Healthy Lifestyle,” Antonia Gonzales and Sarah Gustavus examine the role of farming and traditional foods in increasing access to fresh produce in Native American communities.
Picture of William Heisel
In his farewell post for the Antidote blog, veteran health care journalist Bill Heisel urges fellow journalists to adopt a posture of humility in the face of the vast, complex field that is health and health care.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Antonia Gonzales and Sarah Gustavus traveled to the Navajo Nation recently to examine how a lack of access to water in many homes influences beverage choices and what might be done to increase water consumption among young people.
Picture of William Heisel
The simple act of putting the emphasis on the person and not on their health problem – be it a drug use disorder or something else – will have an impact on how you view the sources of your stories and how the story connects with your audience.
Picture of Monya De
Whether it's Taco Bell’s Naked Chicken Chalupa or the Flamin' Hot Cheeto Bagel, media coverage of stunt foods “only normalizes extreme levels of salt and sugar in food and alters our taste buds to promote addiction,” argues Dr. Monya De.
Picture of Michael Matheson

Did you know that we Americans throw away about 80,000,000,000 (80 billion) pounds of food a year and that only half of us are aware that food waste is a problem?

Picture of Thy Vo

"It's a common experience among many Asian American families — skillfully avoiding the topic of sex until absolutely necessary, which is often too late," reporter Thy Vo writes in part two of her series on discussions of sexuality in Asian American families.

Picture of Pauline Bartolone

“Dollars that were intended for a wide array of medical services started being gobbled up by just one drug,” said Charles Bacchi, president of an industry trade group.

Picture of Jessica Belasco

Delaying care or not getting any at all puts the baby and the mother at greater risk of serious medical problems, and Bexar County, Tex., has one of the highest rates in the nation of premature births. So what might be done to ensure mothers get better care, despite scarce resources?

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COVID-19 has made every journalist a health reporter, whether their usual beat is crime, education or county government.  Our 2021 California Fellowship will make anyone who attends a better health reporter -- and give you a reporting grant of $2,000-$10,000 and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project. Deadline to apply: March 1.

In our next webinar, we’ll analyze Biden’s COVID-19 strategy in the first 100 days — and the huge obstacles the new federal effort must confront. We’ll also look at how Biden plans to address the economic devastation wrought by the pandemic, with a focus on women and vulnerable families. Sign-up here!

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