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Health

Picture of Yvonne LaRose

One of the biggest problems with public health care is knowing where to turn in order to gain reliable information that will lead to reasonable options for care. It's difficult to learn how to receive the proper services. Hollywood accurately portrays the masses sitting in the waiting room wa

Picture of William Heisel

Medical boards from coast to coast are inconsistent, inefficient and ill equipped to monitor the hundreds of thousands of doctors licensed under their watch, Antidote’s investigation of every state board has found. There are some standouts, but, overall, they do a terrible job protecting patients and informing the public.

It bears repeating that most doctors do a great job and are focused on one thing: helping their patients heal and lead healthier lives. The mission of this tour was to explore what happens to that minority of doctors who don’t follow the rules.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

In our last briefing of 2010: a controversy over reporting on chronic Lyme disease. Happy holidays!

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Are there some gaping holes in the PLOS placebo study in today's news? Find out in today's Daily Briefing!

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Should all adults get tested for HIV? Get the latest on this debate and more news from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The CDC's recent food-borne illness stats aren't just about science — there's politics involved, too. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Sandy Kleffman

Several universities throughout California have received sizeable grants for extensive study of stem cells.

Picture of William Heisel

State medical boards are Ellis Islands for doctors. Doctors licensed in another state or fresh out of medical school have to pass muster with the board before being allowed to see patients in that state. If they have a history of problems in other states, the medical board can tell them to look for work elsewhere. One of the most common reasons states cite for disciplining a doctor, in Antidote’s experience, is discipline by another state.

Picture of Angilee Shah

For your Friday reading, here's what's not to miss in today's Daily Briefing.

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Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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