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Healthcare reform in the United States

Picture of Martha Ramirez

Defeat, resignation and inspiration are the three words that best describe those profiled in the series looking into the challenges Latinos in Orange County face when trying to gain access to health care ....

Picture of Elaine Korry

Journalist Elaine Korry embarks on a new reporting project: how will states and insurers decide who gets what health benefits - and for what cost - under the Affordable Care Act?

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

The CBO estimates health law costs, states slash Medicaid, female condoms touted as fashionable and more from our Daily Briefing.

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Alzheimer's research has a promising new gene, the NAACP likes Obamacare, teaching doctors to think about costs and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Tammy Worth

Arguably the most unexpected aspect of the Supreme Court’s Affordable Care Act decision was its reversal of the mandatory expansion of Medicaid. Martha King of the National Conference of State Legislatures provides some tips on how to track this unfolding landscape.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Mystery illness in Cambodia, hepatitis C in New Hampshire, the economic effect of expanding Medicaid and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Heather Boerner

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the bulk of the Affordable Care Act last week was a victory for many people currently unable to access care. But one group was excluded from the innovations and improvement of access to care. Undocumented immigrants make up 11 million of U.S. residents.

Picture of Lisa Zamosky

Consumers are not so much interested in the political implications of the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Affordable Care Act, as they are in knowing how it affects them directly and what insurance will cost.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Soda makers take off the gloves as do Republican governors, while reporters use disease to humanize Ann Romney and surfers protest plans for new nuclear plants in Japan.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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