Skip to main content.

Healthcare reform in the United States

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

Picture of Michael Stoll

In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A reprieve for federal long-term care legislation, a possible FBI investigation of a hospital chain, and woes for Lap-Band marketers, plus more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Martha Ramirez

Many of us might not think twice when making an appointment to see our doctor for whatever is ailing us, but millions of Americans don't have that luxury. Last year's census revealed that close to 50 million of Americans are uninsured, according to a recent Kaiser Health News article. While in 2008, Medscape News used census data to report a hike in the number of Americans living without health insurance for six straight years. 

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

New advice for urpy babies, your brain on traffic fumes, and another legal victory for health reform, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Tracy Wood

Orange County Supervisor Janet Nguyen said numerous complaints spurred her to propose changes to the CalOptima board. Yet records show only five from all supervisors and other top elected officials in four months.

Picture of Tracy Wood

CalOptima is Orange County's system for managing Medi-Cal. With no warning, one county supervisor tried to push through major changes that shifted control of the $1.3 billion program.

Picture of Ryan McNeill

So how can a hospital be judged so deficient by federal inspectors, yet rank among the best in U.S. News & World Report?

It's all in the methodology.

 
Picture of Kate Long

A formerly sickly child, West Virginia's top health official finds himself in the position to affect the health of more than 400,000 West Virginians enrolled in Medicaid, DHHR's biggest program.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A national plan will address the enormous costs of Alzheimer's, dental health cutbacks in California, another ground turkey recall and more from our Daily Briefing.

Pages

Announcements

U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth