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Picture of John Baackes
The CEO of the largest publicly operated health plan in the U.S. makes the case for why we should stop referring to the Affordable Care Act as Obamacare.
Picture of Tracie Potts
As the open enrollment period for health insurance from the nation’s government-run marketplaces opened, Americans found a changed landscape.
Picture of Harvey Barkin
Harvey Barkin wrote this story while participating in the USC Center for Health Journalism‘s California Fellowship.  Other stories in the series include: Full-scope Medi-Cal granted to undocumented children below 19 years old but for how long? Isabella's story
Picture of Carol Marbin Miller
This article and others in this series were produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism....
Picture of Louise McCarthy
Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), community clinics have played an important role providing care for newly insured Americans. Funding for programs that enable community clinics to meet patient's needs will expire on September 30th, if Congress doesn’t act.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A recently-published Stanford University study found that race influences the quality of care premature babies receive. Though, the lead researcher was clear that the study was not about uncovering racial bias.
Picture of Rebecca  Adams
Minnesota officials knew they would exhaust Children’s Health Insurance Program money by the end of this year and likely be out of money for coverage of low-income children and pregnant women by the end of September. And Congress will probably not meet a deadline to help.
Picture of David Lansky
Focusing on how to finance expanded coverage is often compared to moving the deck chairs around on the Titanic: the whole health care enterprise is sinking under the weight of its high costs, and no amount of shifting who pays how much will keep us all from going under.
Picture of Monica Velez
For years Merced County has struggled to convince doctors to come live and work in the rural, impoverished Central Valley community, resulting in a ratio of about 45 doctors for every 100,000 residents.

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